Characteristics of a twin-float seaplane during take-off

Crowley, John W , Jr Ronan, K M
naca-report-242
1927


This report presents the results of an investigation of the planing and get-away characteristics of three representative types of seaplanes, namely, single float, boat, and twin float. The experiments carried out on the single float and boat types have been reported on previously. This report covers the investigation conducted on the twin-float seaplane, the DT-2, and includes as an appendix, a brief summary of the results obtained on all three tests. At low-water speeds, 20 to 30 miles per hour, the seaplane trims by the stern and has a high resistance. Above these speeds the longitudinal control becomes increasingly effective until, with corresponding speeds of 56 to 46 miles per hour. It was further determined that an increase in the load caused little if any change in the water speed at which the maximum angle and resistance occurred, but that it did produce an increase in the maximum angle.

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