A resume of the advances in theoretical aeronautics made by Max M. Munk

Ames, Joseph S
naca-report-213
1926


In order to apply profitably the mathematical methods of hydrodynamics to aeronautical problems, it is necessary to make simplifications in the physical conditions of the latter. To begin with, it is allowable in many problems, as Prandtl has so successfully shown, to treat the air as having constant density and as free of viscosity. But this is not sufficient. It is also necessary to specify certain shapes for the solid bodies whose motion through the air is discussed, shapes suggested by the actual solids - airships or airfoils - it is true, but so chosen that they lead to solvable problems. In a valuable paper presented by Dr. Max M. Munk, of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Washington, to the Delft Conference in April, 1924, these necessary simplifying assumptions are discussed in detail. It is the purpose of the present paper to present in as simple a manner as possible some of the interesting results obtained by Dr. Munk's methods.

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