Effects of sweep and thickness on the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a series of thin, low-aspect-ratio, highly tapered wings at transonic speeds : transonic-bump method

Fournier, Paul G Few, Albert G , Jr
naca-rm-l54b25
April 08, 1954


An investigation by the transonic-bump technique of the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a series of thin, low-aspect-ratio, highly tapered wings has been made in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel. The Mach number range extended from about 0.60 to 1.18, with corresponding Reynolds numbers ranging from about 0.75 x 10(6) to 0.95 x 10(6). The angle of attack range was from -10 degrees to approximately 32 degrees.The effects on drag and lift-drag ratio of a variation in sweep angle from -14.03 degrees to 45 degrees with respect to the quarter-chord line for wings of 3-percent-chord thickness was found to be small in comparison to the effects of a variation in thickness from 2 percent chord to 4.5 percent chord for wings with 14.03 degree sweepback. For the range of variables considered, variations in plan form were considerably more important with regard to longitudinal stability characteristics than the variations in thickness. For the series of basic wings having an aspect ratio of 4, the most hearly linear pitching-moment characteristics were obtained with 26.57 degree of sweepback of the quarter-chord line. However, for the modified series of wings (obtained by clipping the tips of the original wings parallel to the plane of symmetry to give an aspect ratio of 3 and a taper ratio of 0.143), the most nearly linear pitching-moment characteristics were obtained with 36.87 degrees of sweepback. By decreasing the thickness-to-chord ratios from 0.03 to 0.02, a large increase in lift-curve slope was obtained for both the basic and modified wings. All of the wings of both series had fairly large inward shifts of the lateral center-of-pressure location (indicative of tip stalling) with increasing lift coefficient, except those wings having minimum sweepback angles.

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